Yoga Props 101: Common Props & Uses

I compiled a list of the most common yoga props.

Now, a quick note: You don’t actually need any of these props to practice yoga. (Including mats!)

However some, or all, of these props may help you develop a more personalized and enjoyable practice. Props can be used by absolutely everybody, regardless of experience or fitness level.

It’s all about experimenting and seeing what works for you and what doesn’t. The important thing is knowing your options!

So what are the options?

1. Mat

Mats have become a yoga staple, and you’re likely already quite familiar with this one.

There are many types of mats, made with different materials and varying thicknesses. Don’t hesitate to get a mat on the thicker side if you need the cushion.

You don’t need to spend a lot on a mat. If you’re on a budget, discount stores sell them for under $10 and they do the job just fine.

I recommend that you have your own personal yoga mat instead of borrowing the studio’s mat or a housemate’s mat, as it is more hygienic to have your own. Mats are very high-touch props.

2. Blocks

photo credit to unsplash.com/@samantha_shepp

One or, ideally, two blocks can help you explore the different asanas (postures) and feel more comfortable and aligned in them.

You can use household objects instead of buying blocks, such as hardcover books or firm cushions. There are even DIY yoga block tutorials online: For example, this tutorial shows you how to make blocks out of cardboard and tape!

Blocks are so useful because they bring the floor up to you if flexibility or anatomy is an obstacle to achieving the full expression of a pose.

You can use blocks in basically any pose to alter how your body expresses it and to change the sensations in your body as well.

Blocks can also be used in more restorative poses, like placing one under your lower back for Reclined Butterfly Pose or Corpse Pose.

You can also sit on a block to elevate your pelvis in meditation postures. This keeps your spine upright and hips more relaxed.

3. Strap

A yoga strap is great for people with little flexibility, as it increases a student’s range of motion. Straps are useful for students of any level, however. They aid in posture, alignment, and flexibility.

You can use any non-stretchy fabric or rope as a strap, such as neckties. Sometimes new yoga mats come with looped straps to carry the mats around conveniently. You can even use that strap in your practice.

4. Towel

If you sweat a lot, you may be interested in a non-skid yoga towel the size of your mat, which you can wash between uses. They’re commonly used in hot yoga classes.

A towel can also prolong the life of your mat by providing a barrier from rubs and nicks.

A folded towel can also take the place of a folded blanket for cushion under the knees or wrists. Some like to cover themselves with a towel or blanket during long, restorative poses for comfort.

5. Bolster

photo credit to kurma-yoga.com

Bolsters are firm, long pillows commonly used in restorative and, sometimes, prenatal classes. Bolsters aids the body in opening up and relaxing.

6. Blanket

A rolled blanket can be used similarly to a bolster.

A folded blanket can be used for cushion under the knees, wrists, lower back, and hips. Some like to cover themselves with a blanket or towel during long resting poses.

You can also sit on a folded blanket to elevate your pelvis in meditation postures.

7. Eye Pillow

Eye pillows are kind of like eye masks people use for sleeping. Eye pillows are small, cloth bags filled with natural fillings to have a small weight to them.

They are used at the end of class for Savasana and block out light. Eye pillows create a gentle weight on the eyes, aiding in relaxation. They can also be scented for aromatherapy benefits as well.

Thank you so much for reading.
I hope this list helped you gain a better understanding of yoga props and even inspired you to try some of them in your practice!

With love & gratitude,

đź’¬ Comment below: What is your favorite yoga prop?

Follow me on Instagram: @CreepetteYoga
www.creepette.com

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